Click on images to see larger pictures. Use browser Back button to return.

A digital optical module (DOM) disappears down the first hole drilled for the National Science Foundation-supported project known as IceCube. When completed, 4,200 DOMs will be seeded in a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice, making IceCube the world’s largest scientific instrument.
Photo date: 2005
Image credit: John Jacobsen/courtesy IceCube

Overview and drawings of the 'Ice Cube' Neutrino Detector Array
Source: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Illustration by: Dan Brennan.

A total of 4,200 digital optical modules or DOMs, designed to sample high-energy neutrino particles from deep space, are being deployed in 70 deep holes in the Antarctic ice by an international team of scientists, engineers and technicians. Funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, IceCube is being built by an international consortium of universities and scientific laboratories.
Photo date: 2005
Image credit: courtesy Daan Hubert

Working under harsh Antarctic conditions, an international team of scientists, engineers and technicians is working to construct the first critical elements of IceCube, a $272 million massive neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole. Funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, IceCube is being built by an international consortium of universities and scientific laboratories.
Photo date: November 2004
Image credit: courtesy Forest Banks

Pictured in the UW-Madison Physical Sciences Laboratory before being vacuum-sealed, each IceCube digital optical module or DOM is very much like a small computer. A total of 4,200 DOMs, designed to sample high-energy neutrino particles from deep space, are being deployed in 70 deep holes in the Antarctic ice.
Photo date: November 2004
Image credit: Jeff Miller

Engineers and technicians assemble a novel hot-water drill rig at the South Pole. The rig will be used to drill as many as 70 1.5-mile deep holes in the Antarctic ice as part of construction of the IceCube neutrino telescope. When completed, IceCube will be the world's largest scientific instrument and will be capable of detecting high-energy cosmic neutrinos from the deepest regions of space. Funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, IceCube is being built by an international consortium of universities and scientific laboratories.
Photo date: 2005
Image credit: courtesy Jeff Cherwinka

UW-Madison Physical Sciences Laboratory engineers Jim Hoffman (left) and Glen Gregerson prepare to vacuum-seal two halves of an IceCube digital optical module or DOM. The lab is one of three labs in the world that built the 4,200 DOMs that will make up the IceCube detector, a massive neutrino telescope now under construction at the South Pole.
Photo date: November 2004
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Back to article

Wisconsin's Home Page
Copyright © 1995-2017 All About Wisconsin, Inc. All rights reserved.
Wisconline, Wisconsin Online, and Wisconsin.Info are registered trademarks of All About Wisconsin, Inc.

About Us | FAQ | Advertising | Comments | E-mail Us