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Psi Upsilon, Alpha Tau Omega, and Alpha Delta Phi Greek houses (left to right) are seen from Lake Mendota near the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1916. During the late 1800s, many fraternities built houses on land near the university, providing an important source of student housing during that era.
Image credit: courtesy UW–Madison University Archives
Photo Date: 1916

While university officials considered fraternities and sororities “secret societies” in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Greek organizations soon began to take on a much more public image by holding formal balls and other parties, like the one pictured here circa 1950s at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Image credit: courtesy UW–Madison University Archives
Photo Date: 1950s

Langdon Street has been home to many Greek organizations at the University of Wisconsin–Madison since the late 19th century. This picture from 1956 was taken at the corner of Langdon and Henry streets. When the university residence hall system expanded after World War II, many students continued to live in fraternity and sorority houses because of the freedom they offered.
Image credit: courtesy UW–Madison University Archives
Photo Date: 1956

Community service has been a large part of Greek life in the 20th century. In this photo from the 1970s at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the fraternity Theta Chi raises money with a skiing fund-raiser to support cancer research.
Image credit: courtesy UW–Madison University Archives
Photo Date: 1970s
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