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Microscopic view of a colony of original human embryonic stem cell lines from the James Thomson lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These cells, which arise at the earliest stages of development, are blank slate cells capable of differentiating into any of the 220 types of cells or tissues in the human body. They can provide access to tissue and cells for basic research and potential therapies for many types of disease. Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Lab manager Jessica Antosiewicz removes a tray containing vials of frozen human embryonic stem cells from long-term storage in liquid nitrogen in researcher James Thomson's lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Lab manager Jessica Antosiewicz removes a tray of stem cell cultures from an incubator in researcher James Thomson's lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Research specialist Lia Thornberry Kent works under a fume hood dispersing a feeder solution necessary to maintain growing stem cell cultures in researcher James Thomson's lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Research associate Jamie Sperger works under a fume hood dispersing a feeder solution necessary to maintain growing stem cell cultures in researcher James Thomson's lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Developmental biologist and professor of anatomy James Thomson discusses a stem cell culture being prepared by lab manager Jessica Antosiewicz in the Thomson research lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005

Developmental biologist and professor of anatomy James Thomson looks at a stem cell culture being prepared by lab manager Jessica Antosiewicz (not pictured) in the Thomson lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Thomson directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Image credit: Jeff Miller
Photo date: August 2005
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